Global Blackness

black struggles + triumphs + history + culture + politics from a pan-afrikan point of view.
Recent Tweets @kwamezulushabaz

demideviance:

"…you will recognize me for I shall be the tall Black lady smiling.”

She lived so fully, I am not as sad that she is gone - as I am grateful she ever was. Rest In Power…

no no no

(via wontbetelevised)

What is disaster pornography? Africans define it as the Western media’s habit of blacking out Africa’s stock markets, cell phones, heart surgeries, soaring literacy and increasing democratization, while gleefully parading its genocides, armed conflicts, child soldiers, foreign debts, hunger, disease and backwardness.
Gbemisola Olujobi, Nigerian journalist (Via the December 2007 issue of Ebony magazine)  (via the-cat-inside)

(via atane)

taketheshot:

lil-cleopatra:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

If you’re black and this isn’t on your blog… -_-

The power of that symbol! We are powerful!

-Tie

Gotta pass it along

…to the people.

(via black-culture)

medievalpoc:

lo-fem:

darlingmaxi:

nnekbone:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie quotables...

(via www.buzzfeed.com)

✌️

Love her!

[A series of quotes from author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on colored squares with certain words enlarged for emphasis.

1. Power is the ability not just to tell the story of another person, but to make it the definitive story of that person.

2. Show a people as one thing, only one thing,over and over again, and that is what they become.

3. Our histories cling to us. We are shaped by where we come from.

4. A student told me it was such a shame the Nigerian men were physical abusers like the father character in my novel. I told him that I had recently read a novel called American Psycho and that it was a shame that young americans were serial murderers.

5. I often make the mistake of thinking that something that is obvious to me is obvious to everyone else.

6. His advice to me (and he was shaking his head sadly as he spoke) was that I should never call myself a feminist because feminists are women who are unhappy because they cannot find husbands.

7. At some point I was a Happy African Feminist who does not hate men. And who likes lip gloss and wears high heels for herself and not for men.

8. About 52% of the world’s population are women. But most of the positions of power and prestige are occupied by men. The late Kenyan Nobel Peace Laureate Wangari Maathai put it simply and well when she said, “The higher you go, the fewer women there are.”

9. Because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye…I realized that people like me, girls with skin the color of chocolate, who’s kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist in literature.

10. My college roommate asked if she could listen to what she called my ‘tribal music,’ and was very disappointed when I produced my tape of Mariah Carey.]

read more

I’ve bolded the first three quotes because if there is anything this blog is about, that’s a pretty great summary. Thanks to lo-fem for the accessibility.And also because Chimamanda Adichie is a human tour de force.

Official Website

Video: “The Danger of a Single Story”

(via poc-creators)

Since 2010 the UN has been dodging responsibility for a cholera outbreak that has killed 8,500 Haitians and sickened more than 700,000. Nepalese soldiers with the UN “peacekeeping” forces caused the outbreak by allowing their sewage to leak into Haiti’s largest river. According to the UN itself, cholera could kill 2,000 more people in 2014. The UN now faces a lawsuit in U.S. courts that was brought by some of the victims. The Obama administration is trying to have the suit dismissed but, this May, Amicus Briefs filed by prominent international law experts refuted the U.S. government’s arguments for dismissal. Scientific evidence of the UN’s guilt is so conclusive that Bill Clinton, a UN special envoy to Haiti, acknowledged in 2012 that UN soldiers brought cholera to Haiti, but he made the UN’s demented excuse that “what really caused it is that you don’t have a sanitation system, you don’t have a comprehensive water system.” By this logic, if I kill a gravely ill person by knocking them off their hospital bed, my defense should be that a healthy person would have survived the fall. In a civilized legal setting, where the victim cannot be dismissed as irrelevant, making such a repulsive argument might provoke a judge to hand down the harshest sentence allowable. Unfortunately, international law has always been the plaything of the most powerful, and Haitians have long endured the consequences of that fact. Criminal negligence is one of many crimes in Haiti for which UN officials should answer.

Walked into a botanica today…

me: so which items do you use for rituals?

woman: rituals?

me: you know…Santería, Candomblé…

woman: she [the owner] does readings. we dont do black magic, we dont harm people…

me: Santería isn’t bad. it doesnt harm people. You do realize that Santería is an African spiritual system, right?

woman: yes…but we dont harm people…

detroiturbex:

Mark Twain branch library, Detroit MI. Built in 1940, in 1997 the library closed for repairs and never reopened. Demolished in 2011.

(via posttragicmulatto-deactivated20)

stay-human:

I cannot recommend this video enough. This woman breaks it down perfectly.

The Stories That Europe Tells Itself About Its Colonial History

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

“She said once she was shocked that her son while being taught Belgian history, was taught nothing about Congo. She said “They teach my son in school that he must help the poor Africans, but they don’t teach him about what Belgium did in Congo.” Of course, all countries are evasive about the past for which they feel ashamed, but I was shocked by what seemed to me not evasiveness but an erasure of history

If her son doesn’t learn that the modern Congo State began a hundred years ago as the personal property of a Belgian king, who was desperate to get wealthy from ivory and rubber, if her son doesn’t learn that the hands of Congolese people were chopped off for not producing enough resources to meet the king’s greed, if her son doesn’t learn that the Belgian government later led Congo with a deliberate emphasis on not producing an educated class, so that Congolese could become clerks and mechanics but couldn’t go to university, if her son doesn’t learn that more recently, even though it was the Americans who installed the Mobutu dictatorship, Belgium was a major force behind the scenes propping him up, if this young Belgian boy, knows nothing about these incidents, then, at some point, they would perhaps no longer have happened because the past after all is the past because we collectively acknowledged that it is so. 

This young Belgian boy would grow up to see Africa only as a place that requires his aid, his help, his charity with no complications for him. A place that can help him show how compassionate he can be, and most of all, a place whose present has no connection to Europe. 

It is not that Europe has denied its colonial history. Instead, Europe has developed a way of telling the story of its colonial history that ultimately seeks to erase that history”

(via afrocatracho)

thepeoplesrecord:

Florida city police department embedded with KKK members
July 21, 2014

Ann Hunnewell and her central Florida police officer husband knelt in the living room of a fellow officer’s home, with pillow cases as makeshift hoods over their heads. A few words were spoken and they, along with a half-dozen others, were initiated into the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, she says.

Last week, that initiation ceremony, which took place five years ago, stunned residents of the small town of Fruitland Park, who found out an investigative report linked two city officers with the secret hate society that once was violently active in the area. Ann Hunnewell’s ex-husband, George Hunnewell, was fired, and deputy chief David Borst resigned from the 13-member Fruitland Park Police Department. Borst has denied being a member.

James Elkins, a third officer who Ann Hunnewell says recruited her and her husband, resigned in 2010 after his Klan ties became public.

Read More

(via dynastylnoire)

jcoleknowsbest:

radicalrebellion:

weian-fu:

theuppitynegras:

vaganja:

latinosexuality:

ht jfs

'No one ever said that the goal was full integration of these populations,' David Von Spreckelsen, senior vice president at Toll Brothers, another developer specializing in luxury residencies, told The Real Deal in 2013. 'So now you have politicians talking about that, saying how horrible those back doors are. I think it’s unfair to expect very high-income homeowners who paid a fortune to live in their building to have to be in the same boat as low-income renters, who are very fortunate to live in a new building in a great neighborhood.'

^ Are you fucking kidding me?!

wow really? what the fuck do y’all think is gonna happen if you use the same door as my poor Black ass? you think you might be forced to pay a living wage?

This sounds like a sneaky segregation/ Jim Crow reboot. How many Black & Brown folk y’all think are gonna be using that rich door instead of the “poor” one. Fuck these crackers, man.

^^^This exactly what is is. Except it’s not even “sneaky” this shit is blatant. 

Lol… white people just don’t quit…

(via howtobeterrell)

maahsummerscholars:

The research that I did on Maria Stewart was very fascinating. While researching, I learned that she had ties to the abolitionist newspaper, The Liberator, where she had written articles about her beliefs on slavery that was occurring in the south. Also, learned that Maria did a public lecture at…

This morning a Brother from Compton (by way of Ohio) had lots of questions about my ankh, my cowries, and about Africa. It was only a seven minute convo on a public bus, but we covered ancient Egypt, the sacred power and material uses of cowries + African/African American relations.

He said he would love to see Africa but he cited a Kat Williams joke and his ex-girlfriend from Nigeria to support his belief that “Africans don’t want us.” I only had time to reply that whilst there is confusion on both sides, many Africans admire AAs (and vice versa).

The convo reminded me, yet again, that despite the many anti-black stereotypes that we are bombarded with, many AAs are still curious about their heritage.

dayiti:

Haiti’s Influence on Louisiana

Haitians are the dominant Creole culture of New Orleans. Currently there are 5,000 people of Haitian descent that live in the New Orleans area. 

In 1709 (dayiti: I believe the author means 1791 because that’s when the Revolution started) after the Haitian Revolution that ended French rule and gave Haiti its independence 90% of the Hatian refugees settled in New Orleans. The immigration of Haitians, both white and free people of color (gens de couleur libres) brought 2,731 whites, 3,102 free persons of African descent and 3,226 slaves to the city. This one event doubled the population of New Orleans in one year and had an important social and cultural impact on Creole Louisiana that still influences it to this day.

The Hatian Creole population settled in the French Quarter and brought a distinct culture and architectural tradition giving New Orleans a reputation as the nation’s Creole Capital. They brought with them what was to become the rhythm and soul of New Orleans. The Crescent City would not be what it is today without these contributions.

Haitians played a major role in the development of Creole cuisine, the perpetuation of voodoo practices and preserving the city’s French character. Among the most notable Haitians in New Orleans history were; the pirate Jean Lafitte born in Port-au-Prince around 1782. Marie Laveau, the undisputed Queen of Voodoo (dayiti: Her portrait is above), born in [Saint Domingue] in 1794.

(via dawtaofsehkmet)